WILLOW CROSSING

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We were deeply distressed recently when the Institute of Mentalphysics/Joshua Tree Retreat Center, without a permit, cleared 3-plus acres of their land at the corner of the 62 and La Contenta to make a parking lot. Bad enough that this was permanent destruction of intact, native habitat — it was also a crucial part of the wildlife corridor, a place of rest and refuge for wild animals making the dangerous transit across the highway. No longer.

What Mentalphysics did was awful — but there’s something we can do to try to mitigate it. The Mojave Desert Land Trust is appealing to the public to raise $15,000 to kickstart the ~$400k acquisition of 80 acres of wildland on the other side of Mentalphysics, next to MDLT’s headquarters. When purchased by the Land Trust, this land (nicknamed “Willow Crossing”) will become PERMANENT, PROTECTED WILDLIFE CORRIDOR. We need to help make this happen.

Please, follow the link to donate what you can: Scenery Worth Saving #Protect62

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About Jay Babcock

I am the co-founder and editor of Arthur Magazine (2002-2008, 2012-13) and curator of the three Arthur music festival events (Arthurfest, ArthurBall, and Arthur Nights) (2005-6). Prior to that I was a district office staffer for Congressman Henry A. Waxman, a DJ at Silver Lake pirate radio station KBLT, a copy editor at Larry Flynt Publications, an editor at Mean magazine, and a freelance journalist contributing work to LAWeekly, Mojo, Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Vibe, Rap Pages and many other print and online outlets. An extended piece I wrote on Fela Kuti was selected for the Da Capo Best Music Writing 2000 anthology. In 2006, I was one of five Angelenos listed in the Music section of Los Angeles Magazine's annual "Power" issue. In 2007-8, I produced a blog called "Nature Trumps," about the L.A. River. Today, I live a peaceful life in the rural wilderness of Joshua Tree, California, where I am a partner in JTHomesteader.com with Stephanie Smith.
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